Recipes

Broccoli Floating on a Shiitake Dashi (Japanese Broth)

Dashi is the foundation of Japanese cuisine. We developed this version using seaweed (it must be kombu – no substitute will do) and dried shitake mushrooms (instead of the traditional bonito, or powdered tuna.) Kombu is available at Asian markets and natural food stores. Our shitake dashi is my favorite stock of all—I often enjoy a cup of it on its own when it’s finished. Stir in 2 tablespoons of miso paste (any type will do) for miso soup, or add greens and tofu for the best hot pot ever when you’re feeling under the weather. It will keep for up to four days in the refrigerator.

Broccoli Floating on a Shiitake Dashi (Japanese Broth)

Print Recipe
Serves: 6 Cooking Time: 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of dried shitakes
  • ¼ cup of tamari
  • 2 ounces of kombu seaweed
  • 2 heads broccoli
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper

Instructions

1

Combine the shitakes, tamari, kombu and 4 quarts of water in a large stockpot over high heat.

2

Bring the dashi to a boil and simmer for 20 minutes.

3

Cut Broccoli Heads in half. 

4

Blanch in salted boiled water for about 3 minutes (depending on thickness of broccoli).

5

Drain and cut into the florets, cool on a sheet pan. Toss the broccoli with sesame oil, salt, and pepper.

6

Chargrill the broccoli for 3 to 5 minutes or place under a broiler in the oven for 2 to 3 minutes.

7

Remove from the heat and let stand for 5 minutes.

8

Remove the dashi from the stove then strain, cool, and pour the dashi over the charred broccoli.

9

Enjoy!

Notes

Dashi is the foundation of Japanese cuisine. We developed this version using seaweed (it must be kombu – no substitute will do) and dried shitake mushrooms (instead of the traditional bonito, or powdered tuna.) Kombu is available at Asian markets and natural food stores. Our shitake dashi is my favorite stock of all—I often enjoy a cup of it on its own when it’s finished. Stir in 2 tablespoons of miso paste (any type will do) for miso soup, or add greens and tofu for the best hot pot ever when you’re feeling under the weather. It will keep for up to four days in the refrigerator.

Description and recipe courtesy of the Vedge Cookbook. Dish featured in Prescription: Nutrition.

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